Mark Your Calendar for These Professional Development Opportunities in OER

The ROTEL Grant Project Team has partnered with Rebus Community to offer five (5) online webinars of approximately 1 hour each per year on topics related to Open Educational Resources (OER). The following professional development opportunities are available courtesy of the ROTEL federally funded open textbook project and the OER Professional Development Committee. Please share these monthly virtual sessions broadly with your OER community and others you wish to have join your OER community. These virtual sessions are intended to enhance the skills and knowledge of those who are currently adopting/adapting/creating OER resources. However, these sessions will also be useful for those who wish to adopt/adapt OER materials. All sessions will be recorded.

Reserve your spot today by filling out the registration form!

Once you have registered, you will receive a Zoom link one week prior to the workshop. 

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Open Publishing

Friday, February 23, 2024 | 10:30 AM – 11:30 AM ET

In this session, we’ll discuss how Rebus’ open publishing differs from traditional models by keeping diversity, equity, and inclusion in mind throughout the production cycle. Working with the principles of DEI is critical to creating valuable resources, and can have impacts beyond improving the quality of the OER. We’ll highlight how creators in Massachusetts have adopted this approach in their projects.

OER & Universal Design for Learning (UDL)

Friday, March 8, 2024 (Open Education Week) | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM ET

Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is an approach to teaching that asks us to make our classrooms accessible from the start. While doing so can be fairly time intensive, the rewards make it worthwhile. UDL is a key approach to help us achieve the goal of greater inclusion in our teaching, especially with OER. At this session, we will explore the basics of UDL and how OER can help us make strides towards inclusive, innovative teaching and learning experiences.

Interactive OER with H5P

Friday, March 29, 2024 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM ET

With the shift to digital learning in online classrooms, we are reminded about the potential OER can provide to better engage with our students. This session will introduce H5P, a free tool that lets you create interactive content for your textbooks. We’ll look at the range of content types in H5P, see examples from published textbooks, and highlight other tools you can use to make dynamic OER.

Accessibility and OER

Friday, April 19, 2024  | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM ET

One of the major goals of the open education movement is to ensure that learning materials are available and usable widely. Accessibility can be a barrier to widespread OER use and adoption, and is often an afterthought to many textbook publishers. In this session, we’ll explain what we mean by accessibility, remediation, and the work this entails. We’ll provide a set of small but simple ways for you to ensure that your learning materials meet accessibility standards

Creating OER with Students

Friday, May 17, 2024 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM ET

Student voices need to be central in OER projects, especially considering that they are the final users of these materials. In this session, we will showcase a range of OER that have been co-created with students. We will consider the following questions: Where can students join the publishing process? What conversations around ownership, copyright, licensing need to be had? How can this experience be enriching for students?

Photo by Simon Abrams on Unsplash

Research and Publishing Roundup

Here is the latest news in UMD faculty, staff, and community publishing and research:

The Women’s and Gender Studies Department and the University of Rhode Island co-published the fall 2023 issue of the Journal of Feminist Scholarship titled “Translating Transnational Feminisms.” The issue, co-edited by Associate Professor Erin Krafft (Crime & Justice Studies) and Caroline De Souza (’22), argues for the integral position of feminist translation practices and the theories of Feminist Translation Studies as tools for both local and transnational feminist solidarities.Professor Avijit Gangopadhyay (Estuarine & Ocean Sciences) co-published “Recent changes in the upper oceanic water masses over the Indian Ocean using Argo data” in Scientific Reports. The article quantifies different contributions of pure warming and pure freshening processes on the long-term thermohaline changes observed in the Argo era (2003-2019).Professor Brian Williams (History) wrote an article in The Conversation discussing the differences and similarities between ISIS and Hamas by comparing each group’s beliefs and tactics.Assistant Professor Jonathan Kush’s (Management & Marketing) paper “Communication networks and team performance: selecting members to network positions” was adapted into a radio program as part of NSF’s The Discovery Files. The paper examined how individuals come to occupy communication network positions and the effect of selection processes on group performance.Emeritus Professor Fahri Karakaya (Management & Marketing) co-published “Cross Cultural Analysis of Facebook on Global Purchase” in the Journal of Marketing Development and Competitiveness. The article examines the impact of brand influencers, brand generated content, and brand engagement on culture.Senior Advisor to the Chancellor for Economic Development and Strategic Initiatives Michael Goodman co-published a report that analyzed offshore wind companies’ impact on the SouthCoast economy and workforce. The first two years of construction on wind turbines employed nearly 2,000 Massachusetts residents.Associate Professor Robert Darst (Political Science), Associate Professor Gavin Fay (Fisheries Oceanography), and Associate Dean of the College of Engineering Iren Valova co-published “Climate Resilience in Coastal Massachusetts: A Survey of Municipal Challenges, Plans, and Needs” in MassBenchmarks Journal . The piece details the efforts of the Northeast Center for Coastal Resilience, a collaboration across the UMass system, which conducted a survey on coastal resilience in Massachusetts municipalities and produced a comprehensive report on climate-change hazards, resilience strategies, and barriers.Emeritus Professor Fahri Karakaya (Marketing) co-published a chapter titled “Demographics on the use and Importance of nutrition Labels” in Advances in Health Sciences. The chapter examines the research literature on the impact of governmental programs and other food label initiatives.

Do you need help accessing any of these publications? The librarians have you covered. Contact our reference staff: https://lib.umassd.edu/about/staff-directory/contact-rils/

Research and Publishing Roundup

Here’s what’s new in research and publishing at UMassD:

Associate Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences Shannon Jenkins was featured in an article that details how voters gather credible information about candidates and issues in the age of digital disinformation.

Professor Brian Williams (History) published an article about the latest phase in the military campaign against Hamas, which involves navigating a complex network of tunnels below ground.

Professor Steve Lohrenz (Estuarine & Ocean Sciences) co-published “Increased Terrestrial Carbon Export and CO2 Evasion From Global Inland Waters Since the Preindustrial Era” in Global Biogeochemical Cycles. The paper discusses research undertaken to address gaps in global carbon cycling identified in the recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s Sixth Assessment Report.

Brooke Lowman (Ph.D., ’21), Cate O’Keefe (Ph.D., ’13), and Professor Steve Cadrin (Fisheries Oceanography) co-published “Evaluating bycatch avoidance in the U.S. Atlantic sea scallop Placopecten magellanicus fishery” in North American Journal of Fisheries Management. The paper analyzed the bycatch avoidance program’s effectiveness over four years based on fishing behavior relative to bycatch advisories. Using loglinear models to compare frequencies, the research team examined the relationship between bycatch reports from participating vessels and bycatch advisories.

Professor & Montgomery Charter Chair Changsheng Chen (Fisheries Oceanography) co-published “Effects of warming and fishing on Atlantic sea scallop (Placopecten magellanicus) size structure in the Mid-Atlantic rotationally closed areas” in ICES Journal of Marine Science. The paper examines the sea scallop size structures in three rotationally closed areas in the Mid-Atlantic Bight and decomposed their total variances using the variance partitioning method.

Professor Steve Lohrenz (Estuarine & Ocean Sciences) co-published “Soil legacy nutrients contribute to the decreasing stoichiometric ratio of N and P loading from the Mississippi River Basin” in Global Change Biology. The article advocates urgency in integrating soil legacy into sustainable nutrient management strategies for aquatic ecosystem health and water security.Professor Doug Roscoe co-published “The Accreditors Made Us Do It?” in the higher education publication Assessment Update. The article examines how accreditation bodies foster improvement in student learning and recommends eliminating mandates for the program-level assessment reporting cycle.

Need help accessing any of these (or other) articles? Reach out to our Research and Information Literacy Services Librarians.

Research and Publishing Roundup

Check out the latest publishing achievments in the UMassD Community:

Kevin Stokesbury, Dean of the School for Marine Science & Technology and former SMAST students Kyle Cassidy and Travis M. Lowery co-published “Constructing a baseline groundfish trawl survey for an offshore windfarm development area” in Marine and Coastal Fisheries. The article details an experimental bottom trawl survey in the Vineyard Wind lease and adjacent control areas to collect preliminary estimates of fish assemblage composition, density, and size distribution.Associate Professor Scott Field (Mathematics), Assistant Professor Vijay Varma (Mathematics), and doctoral students Tousif Islam and Feroz H. Shai co-published “Analysis of GWTC-3 with fully precessing numerical relativity surrogate models” in General Relativity and Quantum Cosmology. The article discusses their findings , including identifying a binary black hole system most likely formed through dynamical capture and whose collision produced the second fastest-moving black hole observed.

Need help accessing any of these (or other) articles? Reach out to our Research and Information Literacy Services Librarians.

Open Education Conference 2023

The Open Education Conference is hosted annually to share information about open educational resources, open pedagogy, and open education initiatives. This conference celebrates the tenets of open education and promotes learning experiences that are inclusive to everyone, regardless of their background.

The conference was previously held in-person for sixteen-years but is now virtual event. OpenEd23 will be held November 7-9, 2023 online.#Opened23. For more information, check out the attendee guide, and take a look at preview videos of the keynote speakers can be found on the conference website.

There is still time to Register now to attend.

 

Open Access Week Feature: Prof. Anupama Arora Published in OA South Asian Studies Journal

We close out International Open Access Week with a look at an article by Dr. Anupama Arora of the English Communications Department titled “Of Women, Gay Men, and Dead Cats: The Precarity of Neoliberal Aspirations in Made in Heaven.” This article is published in the freely accessible journal, Critical South Asian Studies, which is a bi-annual (published twice a year in February and August), peer-reviewed publication that centers on literary, media and cultural studies. Additionally, Anupama serves as Executive co-Editor of an OA journal called The Journal of Feminist Scholarship.

Please see below for the abstract of “Of Women, Gay Men, and Dead Cats: The Precarity of Neoliberal Aspirations in Made in Heaven:”

ABSTRACT: Written by Zoya Akhtar, Reema Kagti, and Alankrita Shrivastava, the first season of the nine-episode web series, Made in Heaven, premiered on Amazon Prime Video on 8 March 2019 to great acclaim, garnering praise for being both “daring and revelatory” in its “provocative exploration of gender, marriage and love” and for offering “binge-worthy television” (Qureshi). In this essay, we examine how Made in Heaven investigates women’s lives as they navigate precarity, a distinct and historically contingent condition produced by neoliberalism in India. It does so by especially paying attention to the configurations of precarity produced through the intersectional workings of gender and class simultaneously. We argue that the show maps the ubiquity of precarity as it permeates and engulfs all life but ends with offering alternatives to perpetuating neoliberal logics of precarity and precarization by suggesting other possible worlds of solidarities, love, and care.

Research and Publishing Roundup

This week in UMD scholarly publishing, research, and news features:

Professor Viviane Saleh-Hanna (Crime & Justice Studies) co-edited Abolish Criminology, which presents critical scholarship on criminology and criminal justice ideologies and practices and emerging freedom-driven visions and practices for new world formations. The volume features chapters from Crime & Justice Studies faculty members Associate Professor Erin Katherine Krafft with “Marxist Criminology Abolishes Lombroso, Marxist Criminology Abolishes Itself,” Assistant Professor Vanessa Lynn Lovelace with “Abolish the Courthouse: Uncovering the Space of ‘Justice’ in a Black Feminist Criminal Trial,” Assistant Professor Toniqua Mikell with “Trans Black Women Deserve Better: Expanding Queer Criminology to Unpack Trans Misogynoir in the Field of Criminology”, and Saleh-Hanna’s chapters “A Call for Wild Seed Justice” and “The History of Criminology is a History of White Supremacy.” Also featured are chapters written by Charlemya Erasme (’18; MS,’20) with “Biology and Criminology Entangled: Education as a Meeting Point” and Tatiana Lopes DosSantos (’21) with “Civil Lies.”Professor Pia Moisander (Biology; Estuarine & Ocean Sciences) and Abhishek Naik (Doctoral student) co-authored “Disturbance frequency directs microbial community succession in marine biofilms exposed to shear” in mSphere. The article investigated microbial community dynamics in marine biofilms exposed to foul-release paint and/or shear and the impacts of antifouling-induced disturbance on stability in biomass.Assistant Professor Robert J. Gegear (Biology) co-published “Temporal variation of floral reward can improve the pollination success of a rare flowering plant” in Arthropod-Plant Interactions. The article examines a lab experiment with bumblebees foraging on artificial flowers of two colors to investigate whether bees’ foraging behaviors produce a rarity disadvantage.Associate Professor Michael Sheriff (Biology) and Olivia Aguiar (’22) co-published “Short Commentary on Playing it Safe; Risk-induced Trait Responses Increase Survival in the Face of Predation” in the Journal of Veterinary Sciences. The article found that those individuals with greater risk-induced trait responses (i.e., increased risk aversion behavior) had greater survival when exposed to a lethal predator. However, these responses came at the cost of growth.

Need help accessing any of these articles? Reach out to our Research and Information Literacy Services Librarians.

Celebrate International Open Access Week

This year’s theme for International Open Access Week (Oct. 23 – Oct. 29) is Community over Commercialization. Open Access (OA) places the value of accessible information to the public above monetary interest in knowledge dissemination. OA removes restriction from research outputs such as journal articles, books, datasets, and more. Have you ever hit a paywall in your research? Perhaps you have located the abstract for an article that sounds ideal for your project, but then you click to find a request for your credit card. Interlibrary loan is a solution for the UMass Dartmouth community in those circumstances, but what about researchers who do not have library resources available?

The free and immediate availability of academic publications online means that the research will be read and built upon by a wider and more diverse audience. With this greater exposure comes more opportunity in the academic and scientific community. This publishing model is not available for all academic research at this time, but acknowledging Open Access Week is a great way to expand awareness of OA, and to learn more.

Here are some ways to deepen your understanding of OA this week:

  • Check out a print book about OA publishing from the display in library.
  • Access books online from MIT Press Direct to Open.
  • Subscribe to our Scholarly Communications blog for OA features this week and beyond.
  • Stop by the library/MASSPIRG OA Week table from 11am – 3pm on Tuesday Oct. 24th in the library lobby.
  • Attend one of these OA Week webinars:

Research and Publishing Roundup

This blog will periodically highlight some of our UMass Dartmouth Community’s recent achievements in scholarly publishing, research, and news features. Congrats to the following UMD faculty and staff on their newsworthy work:

Professor Pingguo He (Fisheries Oceanography) and Technical Associate Christopher Rillahan (Fisheries Oceanography) co-published “Waiting for the right time and tide: The fine-scale migratory behavior of river herring in two coastal New England streams” in Marine and Coastal Fisheries. The study used high-resolution acoustic imaging to study river herring’s fine-scale behavior during spring spawning migration in two coastal rivers in Massachusetts.Associate Professor Nikolay Anguelov (Public Policy) was featured in an article about the crisis of missing and murdered Indigenous women in America. The article uses Anguelov’s research of data from the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs) database.Associate Professor Gavin Fay (Fisheries Oceanography) co-published “Navigating concepts of social-ecological resilience in marine fisheries under climate change: shared challenges and recommendations from the northeast United States” in ICES Journal of Marine Science. The article discusses the challenges and ambiguity in social-ecological resilience concepts and explores implications for research and implementation.Associate Professor Mark Santow (History) published Saul Alinsky and the Dilemmas of Race. The book focuses on the community organizer’s attempts to grapple with the moral dilemma of race through his organizing efforts and writing.

Need help accessing any of these articles? Reach out to our Research and Information Literacy Services Librarians.

Research and Publishing Roundup

This blog will periodically highlight some of our UMass Dartmouth Community’s recent achievements in scholarly publishing, research, and news features. Congrats to the following UMD faculty and staff on their newsworthy work:

Professor Avijit Gangopadhyay co-published “Observed surface and subsurface Marine Heat Waves in the Bay of Bengal from in situ and high resolution satellite data” in Climate Dynamics. The paper documents that surface marine heatwaves have increased in the Bay of Bengal in number, frequency, duration, and intensity over the last two decades.Assistant Professor Jonathan Kush (Management & Marketing) co-published “Communication networks and team performance: selecting members to network positions” in Frontiers in Psychology. The paper examines how individuals come to occupy communication network positions and the effect of selection processes on group performance.Senior Advisor to the Chancellor for Economic Development and Strategic Initiatives Michael Goodman was featured in an article that examined how policies and politicians in Massachusetts define how the state is viewed through a national political lens.Resident Director Kevin McGinnis published “‘All One in Christ Jesus:’ Physical and Moral Equality in Galatians 3:28″ in the Journal of Religious Competition in Antiquity. The paper argues that Paul’s letter to the Galatians was an example of Hellenistic philosophy, which saw everyone as having equal potential for cognitive clarity and moral goodness without the expectation of political equality.

Need help accessing any of these articles? Reach out to our Research and Information Literacy Services Librarians.