Virtual Panel to Showcase the OER Work of UMassD Faculty

Open Education Week is March 4th – 8th, and one excellent way to celebrate is by attending this virtual panel. This is an opportunity for faculty to learn about OER Commons, a repository for Open Educational Materials (OER) and 3 exciting textbook projects at UMass Dartmouth. Open Educational Materials are teaching and learning tools such as textbooks, tests/quizzes, and classroom activities that are available free of charge. At UMass Dartmouth we have an OER Creators program through which 3 open textbooks were created in 2023. The textbook projects are E-Commerce and E-Business by Shouhong Wang, A Guide to Analyzing Arguments in an Academic Setting by Jackie O’Dell, Joshua Botvin, and Yuan Zhang, and Women’s & Gender Studies by Catherine Gardner. Each author will give an overview of the book they created. This panel will also include a demo of OER Commons by Repository Coordinator Rachel Oleaga. We welcome faculty who are curious about OER, open publishing, digital texbooks, open repositories, or who are just interested in the topics covered by these free textbooks. Register here: https://schedule.lib.umassd.edu/event/12057953?hs=a

Research and Publishing Roundup

Check out the latest publishing achievments in the UMassD Community:

Kevin Stokesbury, Dean of the School for Marine Science & Technology and former SMAST students Kyle Cassidy and Travis M. Lowery co-published “Constructing a baseline groundfish trawl survey for an offshore windfarm development area” in Marine and Coastal Fisheries. The article details an experimental bottom trawl survey in the Vineyard Wind lease and adjacent control areas to collect preliminary estimates of fish assemblage composition, density, and size distribution.Associate Professor Scott Field (Mathematics), Assistant Professor Vijay Varma (Mathematics), and doctoral students Tousif Islam and Feroz H. Shai co-published “Analysis of GWTC-3 with fully precessing numerical relativity surrogate models” in General Relativity and Quantum Cosmology. The article discusses their findings , including identifying a binary black hole system most likely formed through dynamical capture and whose collision produced the second fastest-moving black hole observed.

Need help accessing any of these (or other) articles? Reach out to our Research and Information Literacy Services Librarians.